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Your Servants and Your People: The Walkin’ Trilogy (Book Two) review

Originally posted on The Horror Hothouse:

Image sourced from jofletcherbooks.com

Image sourced from jofletcherbooks.com

Your Servants and your People is part two of a zombie story, but it’s a zombie story with a difference.

In Your Brother’s Blood, (Book One of the Walkin’ trilogy) author David Towsey established a future post apocalyptic world where humanity appeared to have regressed to a point similar to that of the American Old West at the time of the American Civil War, but with a big difference: when people die, some of them come back. However these Walkin’ were not the shuffling brain eating zombies of the Romero mythos, they came back as themselves. No longer needing food, sleep or water. Some, like Thomas McDermott, were still driven to care for their living families, but this went against the teachings of the local religious leaders, who believed that the only good Walkin’ is a dead Walkin’.

Your Servants and Your People follows the McDermott…

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The Wolves of London: Obsidian Heart review

Originally posted on The Horror Hothouse:

Image sourced from amazon.co.uk

Image sourced from amazon.co.uk

When the teenage Alex Locke did his bird for armed robbery, hard man Benny Magee took him under his protection. Prison worked for Alex, he worked hard, came out with an academic degree and walked into a job at a college. Now with his older daughter threatened by a gang of drug dealers, Alex needs Benny’s help again, but nothing in this world comes without a price.

Problem is the price involves another robbery. Not a blag this time, but a burglary. To get the cash to pay off the dealer Alex has to break into the house of an elderly stage magician and steal one specific artefact. A human heart carved out of volcanic glass. A simple job on the face of it, but Alex didn’t count on the Wolves of London, a nightmarish group of supernatural entities that haunt the underworld of organised crime…

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Zombie Bites review

Originally posted on The Horror Hothouse:

Simon Ball and David Saunderson at Zombie Bites. Image courtesy of Newton Photographic (www.facebook.com/Newtonphotographic)

Simon Ball and David Saunderson at Zombie Bites. Image courtesy of Newton Photographic (www.facebook.com/Newtonphotographic)

What is it about zombies that has caught the contemporary horror fan’s imagination? Sure, they are pretty nasty with all that brain eating and shambling about making the place look really untidy, and I bet they pong pretty bad too, but on the other hand they ain’t too bright and are pretty easy to kill. We get a lot of zombie fiction submitted to the Hothouse for review. and if we are being honest, much of it riffs rather too much off George A Romero’s films, so it was with a degree of nervousness that we opened up Zombie Bites the follow up to last year’s Dracula’s Midnight Snacks vampire anthology from our friends at the Spooky Isles and Red Rattle Press.

I needn’t have worried, the 19 tales chosen by Spooky Isles editor David Saunderson from stories submitted…

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Devils in Disguise: Q&A with Filmmaker Guillaume Campanacci

Originally posted on The Horror Hothouse:

Image sourced from indiegogo.com

Image sourced from indiegogo.com

If there is one thing we like at the Hothouse, it’s film folks with a ‘can-do’ attitude. French filmmaker Guillaume Campanacci certainly fits that bill having knocked out Devils in Disguise, his debut movie as director in just 11 days.

In Devils in Disguise, Guillaume has brought a very Gallic twist to what is a taut psychological thriller concerning friendship, love, trust and murder set in urban California, and now he needs a little bit of post production help through an Indiegogo campaign to bring the finished film out to us film fans.

I caught up with Guillaume in Los Angeles (by e-mail, we do this for love not expenses you know) where I asked him about how he got to become a filmmaker, it wasn’t as straightforward as you might have imagined.

“I was born and raised in Cannes, the home of The Cannes Film Festival. I…

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Legacy of Thorn (2014)

Originally posted on The Horror Hothouse:

Image sourced from legacyofthorn.vhx.tv

Image sourced from legacyofthorn.vhx.tv

So, we’ve had Halloween, we’ve had Friday the 13th… and come to think of it, the Ides of March didn’t end too well either. Now it’s the turn of February 29th, which thankfully only comes around every four years.

You see every February 29th Thorn, a machete wielding masked serial killer, manifests himself and goes on the rampage. It wrecks Jessica’s (Jade Wallis) 16th (or is that fourth?) birthday in 2008 when she and her mates get locked into school after hours, but now four years later she and the other three survivors have stunned the killer with a dose of electric current and have him unmasked and chained up in a secret warehouse. As they argue about who is going to terminate the evil bastard, the cops turn up and let him go. Bad, bad idea.

Structurally, the writers have tried to fragment the story by…

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Invasion (1965)

Originally posted on The Horror Hothouse:

Image sourced from networkonair.com

Image sourced from networkonair.com

Drinking and driving is a bad idea, especially when the army radar is picking up mysterious flying objects that are too small to be the old British Air Ferries transporters on the way back from Le Tourquet. That’s what Lawrence Blackburn (Anthony Sharp) discovered back in 1965 when a rubber suited man (Eric Young) staggered out of the woods into the path of his car.

The mystery deepens when Blackburn gets him to the local hospital. An X-Ray reveals that old rubber suit has a metal object embedded in his brain and his blood does not match any known type. Back in the woods Major Muncaster (Barrie Ingham) and his men have discovered a set of radioactive scorch marks in the forest and bullet-proof space capsule. Can they belong to the mysterious rubber clad stranger?

Back at the hospital the patient recovers consciousness and reveals to Dr Mike Vernon (Edward…

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Unearthly Stranger (1963)

Originally posted on The Horror Hothouse:

Image sourced from horrorpedia.com

Image sourced from horrorpedia.com

Well, you wait for ages for some Cold War era Brit Sci-fi flicks and then two of them come along together! Hot on the heels of 1965’s Invasion from our friends at Network comes Unearthly Stranger.

Unearthly Stranger’s paranoia comes in at a more subtle tack to that of Invasion. Scientists at Britain’s  Royal Institute of Space Research are close to cracking a formula to project the mind into outer space. When Professor Munro (a-pre Alf Garnett Warren Mitchell) announces that he’s done it to his secretary (a pre-Upstairs Downstairs Jean Marsh) he suffers a fatal brain haemorrhage and his notes are reduced to ashes. Odd that, because exactly the same thing happened to scientists working on the same project in the USA and Russia.

Munro’s replacement is Dr Mark Davidson  (John Neville), but Security’s Major Clarke (Patrick Newell) is a bit concerned about…

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