Gants Hill Tube Station – A Bit of Essex Buried Treasure

Many moons ago we lived somewhere between Gants Hill and Barkingside in London’s Essex overspill. Rapidly urbanised between the 20th century’s two World Wars it was ideally situated for London’s commuters and an aspirational destination for East-end boys made good. Still aspirations being what they are. about seventeen years ago we moved on to a part of Essex with access to Epping Forest. Curiously, in the way of people saying ‘Small world isn’t it’ I had to return to our old neighbourhood this week to collect a bathroom fitting from a shop just around he corner from where we used to live. The shop used to be an off-licence where I frequently stopped to chew the fat with manager Bernard, but that’s another story.

One of the things that fuelled the eastward expansion of London was the London Underground’s Central Line and considering what an architectural wasteland Gants Hill is, the tube station below is a little piece of buried Art Deco treasure.

The vaulted ceiling of Gants Hill Tube Station

London Underground began work on the station during the 1930s. The architect was one Charles Holden who aside from his work for London Transport also designed the University of London’s Senate house. Holden had also advised upon the construction of the Moscow Metro , hence the rather marvelous barrel vaulted ceiling of the concourse between the platforms. Hitler disrupted building for a few years when the excavations were used as an air raid shelter and a munitions factory and the station eventually opened up in 1947.

The Art Deco uplighters cast a distinctive halo on the vaulted ceiling

Unlike many of Holden’s very distinctive London Underground stations, like say Arnos Grove or  Southgate, nearly all of the station is beneath the ground including the ticket office, but I think the beauty of the platform concourse makes up for the lack of any external features

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Gants Hill Tube Station – A Bit of Essex Buried Treasure

    • It does look a bit grim above ground at Gants Hill, but there is a very good (and expensive) Chinese restaurant The Mandarin Palace and the Corinthian Taverna always used to be good for a meze at the weekend. Having said that although they are both still there we haven’t used either of them for quite some time.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s